The Palestine Herald, Palestine, Texas

Local News

July 4, 2014

Texas confirms first West Nile case of the season

PALESTINE — The Texas Department of State Health Services Thursday confirmed the state’s first case of West Nile illness of the season. DSHS is urging people to take precautions to reduce the risk of contracting West Nile virus, a mosquito-borne illness.

“The best way to protect yourself is by using insect repellent every time you go outside,” said Tom Sidwa, State Public Health veterinarian and manager of the Zoonosis Control Branch. “West Nile virus can make people very sick, with symptoms that can last for weeks or months.”

West Nile fever was confirmed in a patient from Travis County. Additional details about the patient are not being released to protect the patient’s identity.

The West Nile season typically runs from June through October. Last year, there were 183 human cases of West Nile illness in Texas, including 14 deaths. The 2012 season was an unprecedented year for West Nile with record numbers of cases and deaths reported in the state. The intensity of West Nile activity in Texas fluctuates from year to year and is difficult to predict. It depends on a variety of factors including the weather, the numbers of birds and mosquitoes that maintain and spread the virus and human behavior. The season can last up until the first hard freeze of the year.

To reduce exposure to West Nile virus:

  • Use an approved insect repellent every time you go outside and follow the instructions on the label. Among the EPA-approved repellents are those that contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products.

  • Regularly drain standing water, including water collecting in empty cans, tires, buckets, clogged rain gutters and saucers under potted plants. Mosquitoes that spread West Nile virus breed in stagnant water.

  • Wear long sleeves and pants at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.

  • Use air conditioning or make sure there are screens on all doors and windows to keep mosquitoes from entering the home.

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