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With nearly 150,000 inmates, the population of the state prison system exceeds that of Tyler, College Station, or Waco. Yet, this government behemoth operates in the hazy half-light of media reports, triennial inspections, and the public's imagination. Inside the Texas Department of Criminal…

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With nearly 150,000 inmates, the population of the state prison system exceeds that of Tyler, College Station, or Waco. Yet, this government behemoth operates in the hazy half-light of media reports, triennial inspections, and the public's imagination. Inside the Texas Department of Criminal…

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Our local medical group began using new electronic medical record software this spring. That doesn't sound like a big deal, but when you've been in practice nearly 35 years, a gazillion mole hills make a large flat mountain.

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The outpouring of grief in Annapolis, Maryland, over the last week, following the slaughter of four journalists and a sales associate at the Capital Gazette newspaper, reflected the solidarity of a small town with its local press.

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Thirty-five years ago, as the editor of a suburban Boston newspaper, I faced a hostile crowd in a church meeting room over a story my newspaper had written about the public suicide of a young man. Efforts to persuade him to give up his gun blocked main street traffic for several hours and ca…

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By banning the public from inside the Anderson County jail, Sheriff Greg Taylor continues to treat the local lockup as his personal property.

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Over the last few weeks, Texans have heard from many people with a stake in school safety – and, really, that's all of us. In the aftermath of another massacre, school administrators, law enforcement, teachers, politicians, and other stakeholders have raised their voices.

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Anderson County Sheriff Greg Taylor is asking county commissioners for about $70,000 a year to raise jailer salaries. Higher pay, he said, would enable him to recruit and retain enough jailers to accommodate the county's inmate population.

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A new “zero-tolerance” policy recently enacted by the Trump administration as a “deterrent” from illegal immigration is separating children from parents as they cross the border into the United States.

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The last weekend in May is almost here. You can smell the barbecue. You can watch gas prices rise for the millions of Americans hitting the road for the long weekend that unofficially kicks off summer, and, if we're sticklers for propriety, permits us to wear white again.

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When the criminal justice system overreaches, the lust for punishment overshadows common sense, resulting in charges that serve neither justice nor the taxpayer.

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Sunday is Mother's Day. For those of you who just got the word, there's still time to order flowers for delivery, schedule a phone call, or even pack the kids into the SUV and take mom to brunch.

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This week, I celebrated the first day of the last year of my forties. And if the calendar hadn't alerted me, my popping joints and aching bones would have.

During my student teaching semester in Paducah in 1999, the bad news came. Two students had stashed rifles in their trench coats, stuffed bombs into duffel bags, and marched into Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. They killed 13, and injured 23.

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This week, the nation observed the 50th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King, while he was in Memphis, supporting striking sanitation workers. The anniversary on April 4 has prompted African Americans,whites, and all Americans to reflect on what has changed in race…

editor's pickfeatured

This week, the nation observed the 50th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King, while he was in Memphis, supporting striking sanitation workers. The anniversary on April 4 has prompted African Americans,whites, and all Americans to reflect on what has changed in race…

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For years, Anderson County cops turned a blind eye to illegal gaming. That ended last August, when Andy Harvey became Palestine's top cop. The former Dallas command officer called illegal gaming a crime magnet and pledged to act.

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Dirt is a constant. It's always there, though unobtrusive, unless your shoes drag it into the house, or a heavy machine dents its soft wet skin. Otherwise, it lets you move on, without complaining or asking favors.

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The 2018 Pyeonchang Winter Olympic games are in full swing, despite record-low temperatures and debilitating winds. Athletes from around the globe have been training for years, and in some cases decades, to have the opportunity to represent their countries as the “best of the best.”

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Following a week-long investigation by Palestine Police, high school teacher Samantha Woolverton, 32, was arrested on Tuesday for an improper relationship with a student. Charged with a second-degree felony, Woolverton faces 2-20 years in prison.

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I became a father later in life, having my first child, Nathan, at age 46. His brother, Kenneth, arrived two years later, when Daddy was nearly eligible for an AARP membership card.

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The article, “Water quality? Hold your nose and swallow” (Feb. 1), severely misrepresented Palestine's water quality, as well as how it's paid for.

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In celebration of Black History, we, the Anderson County Negro Historical Preservation Committee, appreciate Herald-Press Editor Jeffery Gerritt for his outstanding reporting of our neighbors in East Africa (Saving lives, dreams in East Africa, Dec. 20).

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Members of the the Elkhart City Council showed again last week why they’re on their way to becoming the worst council in East Texas. Council members had already booted the city’s volunteer fire department. They also approved contracts to two high-ranking employees that could bankrupt the city.

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Americans have debated a designated month to honor the cultural and historical contributions of African Americans, since the U.S. government officially recognized Black History Month in 1976.

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During my first year in practice in Palestine, an old man who had a large heart attack complicated by congestive heart failure, came to my office about six weeks after the event, proudly telling me he was so much better, he could now mow his yard.

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Over the last six months, Sheriff Greg Taylor has run his office as he would a fiefdom. 

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Palestine's Alonzo Marion Story was not a fiery revolutionary, as was Nat Turner before him and Malcolm X after. But in his own quiet way, this beloved educator, principal of Lincoln High School from 1924 to 1949, battled racism all his life.

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By failing to terminate Mike Alexander's $100,000 buyout this week, City Council members continued their romance with their erstwhile city manager, and stuck Palestine residents with the tab.

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When local law enforcement officers are suspected of breaking the law, a higher authority — state or federal — must look into it. If they do not, justice is compromised. Suspicions that the law is not enforced in a fair and even-handed manner are rightfully aroused.

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I appreciate the editorial in the Tuesday, Sept. 19, Herald-Press (City manager's resignation best for Palestine). Someone needs to speak out on the way our city conducts its business.

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The resignation last week of Palestine City Manager Mike Alexander — just as he shook down the city for another $100,000 — is best, not only for Alexander but also Palestine. With Alexander no longer calling the shots at City Hall, members of City Council should usher in a new era of account…

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